Resources For

Health Harms

This section provides everything you need to effectively communicate all of the negative impacts of tobacco, showing how it’s deteriorating our economies and our health. Our resources are organized into each of the following message sections:

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Tobacco is responsible for 12% of all deaths of those over 30.

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The U.S. smoking rate has fallen to 15 percent, nationwide. Although, among less-educated people the smoking rate remains at more than 40 percent.

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Being smoke-free means being there for the moments in life that matter most.

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A smoker’s cough can be one of the first warning signs of a deadly disease.

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Save your vision–quit smoking.

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World No Tobacco Day is a good reminder of just how many people are negatively impacted by tobacco.

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Unless we act now, tobacco will kill one billion people this century.

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Smokeless tobacco isn’t safe. It is known to increase the risk for heart disease and stroke.

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What do cigarettes and radioactive waste have in common? They both contain polonium.

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Tobacco negatively impacts us all. It endangering our health, increases poverty and damages the environment.

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Think smokeless tobacco is safer? Think again. Smokeless tobacco contains the same toxic chemicals and 3x the nicotine as cigarettes.

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Use Women’s Health Month as an opportunity to quit smoking.

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Finding out how much smoking is costing your business. The results will surprise you.

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This infographic maps out all of the deadly chemicals found in a single cigarette.

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What exactly are you smoking? This infographic helps break down a few of the 7,000 chemicals found in a single cigarette.

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If you won’t quit smoking for yourself, will you do it for your pets?

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Cigarette waste is the number one littered item on U.S. shorelines, waterways and on land.

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The tobacco plant itself contains harmful chemicals, including highly addictive nicotine.

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States that are 100% smoke-free see reduced emergency room visits for asthma and heart attacks.

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What do cigarettes and nuclear weapons have in common? They both contain beryllium.

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What do cigarettes and toilet cleaner have in common? They both contain ammonia.

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Celebrate Women’s History Month by standing up for women’s health and saying no to smoking.

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Babies gets more oxygen when pregnant women refrain from smoking.

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Smoking kills. In fact, smoking causes 1 out of every 3 deaths from cardiovascular disease.

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Smoking kills. Nearly 90% of lung cancer cases are caused by smoking.

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Smokeless tobacco, chew, and dip cause cancer.

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A new study from WHO and the U.S. National Cancer Institute shows that smoking costs the global economy more than $1 trillion a year.

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What do cigarettes and pesticides have in common? They both contain strychnine.

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Commit to a healthier heart for you and your loved ones by quitting smoking this Valentine’s Day.

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Who are you going to believe, doctors or Big Tobacco?

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Tobacco kills. In fact, 1 in every 5 cancer deaths is linked to tobacco use.

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Saving lives should transcend politics. 1/3 of cancers are preventable by reducing tobacco consumption.

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Tobacco takes too many lives. Together, let’s end deaths caused by tobacco.

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There are already numerous reasons to quit smoking, but a recent study shows that smoking thickens the heart wall, reducing pumping ability.

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Learn from Linda’s story. She had a stroke 9 years ago and lost the use of half of her body.

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It’s plain and simple — tobacco kills. Tobacco is the cause of 12% of all deaths of those over 30.

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Think you know the effects of smoking? Take the quiz and test your knowledge.

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Love your pets? Show them by being smoke-free around them. Secondhand smoke is harmful to your furry friend.

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Ten years after quitting, your lung cancer risk can drop by half.

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Almost 80% of COPD deaths are caused by smoking.

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Smoking constantly causes mutations in DNA, often leading to cancer.

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Smoking can cause plaque buildup in your arteries, which can lead to heart attack or stroke.

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Smoking cigarettes can make your facial skin grayish.

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Dip users have an 80% higher risk of oral cancer.

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After 2-3 months of quitting smoking your risk of heart attack begins to drop.

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Smoking increases the risk of catching the flu by weakening the immune system.

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Smoking causes 1 in 3 cancer deaths.

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Smoking cigarettes can lead to premature wrinkles.

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Smoking costs the United States $170 billion in health care bills every year.

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Cigarette smoking kills taste buds.

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